Variety in Styles

Most of you know that post-processing is a big part of a photographer’s job- especially newborn photographers. From composite shots to fading out those hard lines from the backdrop, a newborn photographer spends a lot of time in front of the computer!

Here at Custom Photo Props, we love watching our customers grow in to their art and develop a style of editing that is truly unique. These collages below show off our Honeydew and Frozen Faux Furs in various different temperatures and detail. All of our fur colors are custom made for our company and we’re very proud of having colors that are so versatile!! <3 <3

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www.customphotoprops.com

Exposure: Interview Series

exposure
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Happy Happy Friday!! Hope you all had a wonderful week have exciting plans for the weekend :)  Today for our Exposure Interview we’re happy to introduce Kelly Ross, a trusted colleague of ours. You can find some of her work on our own website as product photos. Scroll on down to learn more about her and her business!
1)      Who are you and where are you located?
I am Kelly Ross of Kelly Ross Photography. I am located in Agawam, MA and a second studio in Simsbury, CT
2)      Do you have a home studio, rented space, or are you on location?
I have a 900 sq foot studio in Agawam, MA and a 1000 sq ft studio in Simsbury, CT
3)      What subjects are your primary focus and which do you enjoy shooting the most?
My specialty is Newborns I love everything about capturing those first photos of new little ones.
4)      There are so many different kinds of camera’s out there! What do you use and how did you decide on that particular one?
I shoot with a Nikon D700…. I upgraded in the past to a D800 and even tried out a D4… I still went back to my D700!!!
5)      While we’re talking about equipment, what lens do you prefer to use and why?
My go to Lens is the Sigma Art series lens 35 mm 1.4 … I use it for all in studio sessions. My go to for outside sessions is my Nikkon 70-200 VR2 2.8
6)      We hear a lot of debate on natural light vs. studio light, what are your thoughts on the subject?
This is a hard one for me. I ADORE natural light… my last studio space had 30 ft ceilings and a wall of 14 ft windows… the natural light is like no other (as long as you have a good day- overcast days can be killer) switching over to my new Agawam, MA studio I had to go to studio light- I use a Einstein with a 86″ PLM…. it is a nice replacement for natural light and very consistent… has made editing more consistent. In my CT studio I am able to do both studio and natural!!!
7)      How did you learn to be a photographer?
I always had a camera in my hand. I interned for a wedding photographer in college after taking some photography courses and always felt it was something I wanted to do. When I had my 3rd child in 2008 she became my every day subject and friends starting asking me to take photos of their kids. I took some classes to brush up on the new age of digital and by 2009 I started my business. Back then there were no posing workshops and for prop shopping you had to be super creative as Etsy didn’t exist. Finding shops like custom photo props has been amazing for my business!!!!  I have since taken many workshops as I am always trying to perfect my skills. And I even offering mentoring to many photographers starting out.
8)      What or who inspires you? Do you have a photographer you look up to?
To pick just one photographer who inspires me would be impossible. My original passion for babies comes from Anne Geddes…. and I do like to credit my drive of being a motivate mama from Ana Brandt of Taopan. When I started you couldn’t even google newborn photography and find anything other than Anne or little video clips of Ana shooting maternity or babies in her home studio. I thought if she can make that space work so can I. I later became friends with her and consider her an amazing mentor!!! I also consider Sabine Brandt (no relation to Ana lol) from Living Dreams Photography Workshop to be life changing with my newborn posing.
9)      When you’re doing a photoshoot or working an event, what is your favorite part?
My favorite part of any newborn session is when Mom or dad hand their precious week out little baby to me and almost every single mom says- he/she hates being naked and I hope you can get some shots. I love to then have them sit back and watch me work as I not only get some shots but 40-50 final images of their sweet baby in poses they never dreamed their baby would do!!!
10)   What have you struggled with the most while having a career as a professional photographer? Any tips for somebody who is just starting out?
The biggest thing I struggle with is the business side of things in a over saturated market. Staying true to what I think my value is and offering the best I can even though sometimes parents are just looking at cost. My advice is to stay strong when starting out and never under value your time just because the person next door is giving it away. Take a business course- Heidi Hopes business workshop changed my world and helped me look at this from the technical side- the side we would rather think doesn’t exist. But to stay successful you have to make sure you are doing things the best way!
11)   Do you have any unconventional tips or tricks for getting your little clients to cooperate during a shoot?
When working with newborns everything I do is pretty typical in terms of making sure moms and dads are prepped ahead of time to have the most successful session. If they follow my directions its almost always a win!!!
12)   Where would you like to see your company in the next five years?
I would like to focus more on newborns only and be able to hire in a couple associate photographers to take over the children’s sessions!!!
                                                                                                                                                                                www.kellyrossphotography.com
Thanks Kelly!!
www.Kelly Ross Photography.com www.Kelly Ross Photography.com

365 Day Giveaway

365giveaway

We’re doing a Daily Giveaway on Facebook! Bookmark our page, save it in a separate browser, do whatever you need to, in order to check our page every day so you don’t miss out. We’re super excited about this one and think it’s going to be a lot of fun for all involved!

Rules:

1.) Tag a Friend (or several friends) in the daily Giveaway post on our Facebook.

2.) Visit our website, www.customphotoprops.com and sign up for our newsletter. We send out coupons or new product info once a month. If you already subscribe omit this step.

3.) Search our website for a bogus listing. If you find it, you are to purchase the listing. There is only 1 Quantity so only 1 person can win a day. Prize will vary daily from $13.00 – $40.00! Winner must pay shipping at checkout. If you select First Class mail, shipping should be under $4.50.

Contestant is only eligible to win once per week.

Items will vary for the giveaway each day. Some items we may include will be overalls, headbands, faux fur, diaper covers, hats, etc..

We will try to post every 24 hours.

We also have the right to cancel this giveaway if we so choose.

Exposure : Interview Series

exposure
It’s Thursday, so that means the weekend is almost here! Who else is excited to go outside and enjoy some nice weather and eat some BBQ for Memorial Day??   Today with our Exposure Interview, I’d like you to meet Buena Farrell. I think we can all relate to her answer for number 10, and I know I’ll definitely be looking up that class!
1)      Who are you and where are you located?
Buena Farrell of Buena Farrell Photography in Ellsworth WI.
2)      Do you have a home studio, rented space, or are you on location?
 I just moved into the most amazing building in my town.   It’s a 119 year old brick building with the original hardwood floors and tons of character.  Located on the Main St of my town.  It was a bank at one point and still have the 2 vault doors.  :)   I also shoot on location during the nicer months of the year which are really limited to May- Sept ;)
3)      What subjects are your primary focus and which do you enjoy shooting the most?
My primary focus is children and newborns.   Newborns are definitely my favorite though and if I could shoot them exclusively I would be in heaven.
4)      There are so many different kinds of camera’s out there! What do you use and how did you decide on that particular one?
I shoot with a Nikon D700.  When I first started I was shooting Canon and my best friend was shooting Nikon so I decided to switch so we could share lenses.  :)
5)      While we’re talking about equipment, what lens do you prefer to use and why?
 I always shoot with my 50mm 1.4 in studio and my 85mm 1.8 for outdoor sessions.   I started using a macro lens for my newborn session and I’m using a 60mm 2.8.  I have tried using the 24-70mm which is a beautiful lens but I’m a prime girl and I just couldn’t get use to shooting with a zoom lens.
6)      We hear a lot of debate on natural light vs. studio light, what are your thoughts on the subject?
 When I first started I was strictly natural light just because I couldn’t afford a light set up and I didn’t have any where to put it since I was shooting in my living room.  I have since switched to studio lights for when I’m shooting in my studio and obviously natural light when I’m outside.  My studio does have a good amount of beautiful natural light but I still prefer the studio lights especially on those gloomy days or if I’m shooting in the evening.
7)      How did you learn to be a photographer?
 I just did. :)   LOTS and LOTS of reading and researching and screwing up and then figuring it out.   I didn’t have any training on becoming a photographer but I have attended a few workshops to help me take my photography to the next step.
8)      What or who inspires you? Do you have a photographer you look up to?
When I first started in photography I was in awe of Kelley Ryden and Tracey Raver.  They have so many amazing set ups.   My favorite newborn photograph would have to be Sabine from Living Dreams Photography.  I actually met her a few years ago at Kelley & Tracey’s workshop and it has been wonderful to watch her become this amazing photographer.  I love everything about her work!
9)      When you’re doing a photoshoot or working an event, what is your favorite part?
When I’m shooting newborns I just love everything about them.  Their tiny little part, the way they smell and I love cuddling with them too.  When I’m shooting children I love just trying to make them laugh and have fun at the session.   Play silly games, sing songs and just have fun and be goofy.
10)   What have you struggled with the most while having a career as a professional photographer? Any tips for somebody who is just starting out?
 I’ve struggled with the business side of things.  Every year I tell myself I’m going to be more organized but that doesn’t happen.   I took Rachel Benke’s online workshop and I’d say that was so helpful.  I actually wish I would have taken it when I first started and not 4 years into my business.
11)   Do you have any unconventional tips or tricks for getting your little clients to cooperate during a shoot?
 Chuck the chicken.  :)  He’s a squeaky dog toy but man the kids love him.
12)   Where would you like to see your company in the next five years?
Oh gosh this is tough!   I’d love to see myself focus more on newborn and babies.  I’m hoping that I can become a better business women and be more organized.
Thanks Buena!!
customphotoprops.com
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Gearing up for Family Photos

Today we were scrolling the Net and found something we thought might help some families out there who are ready to take the plunge into family photos!

http://blog.mpix.com/2015/05/5-things-your-photographer-wants-you-to-know-2/

Exposure : Interview Series

exposure
Welcome back to our blog, everybody! Today, I have the pleasure of introducing Traci from Pink Toenails Photography. She has some incredibly wonderful things to say about valuing your own talents and your time. Read on to find out more.
1)      Who are you and where are you located?
My name is Traci and I own Pink Toenails photography based out of Eau Claire, WI
2)      Do you have a home studio, rented space, or are you on location?
 I photograph outdoors in the non-winter months, on-location and have a small in home studio for newborns.
3)      What subjects are your primary focus and which do you enjoy shooting the most?
 I mainly photograph newborns through the toddler age.  I also photograph births and maternity.
4)      There are so many different kinds of camera’s out there! What do you use and how did you decide on that particular one?
 I used to use a crop sensor 60d, that’s a canon. :)  I made the switch to a canon 5d markIII.  I needed a camera that was great in every lighting situation…especially low light.  When photographing births, this camera is a MUST as sometimes you are photographing at an ISO of 12,000.  This helps so you can still deliver your clients beautiful photos of their once in a lifetime event.
5)      While we’re talking about equipment, what lens do you prefer to use and why?
 I currently use a 50 1.8, but will be upgrading that to a 50 1.4.  There are a lot of lenses I would love to have, but the cost of them is a little more than I can currently afford.  One of those would be a 35mm and another the 100mm macro.
6)      We hear a lot of debate on natural light vs. studio light, what are your thoughts on the subject?
 I use both.  I love both.  Sometimes you need to use studio light.  When I photograph newborns I use natural light and enhance that with studio because the light coming in is never enough ( small window).  I do prefer natural light and love photographing outdoors because of this.
7)      How did you learn to be a photographer?
 I bought a point and shoot camera about 6 years ago and loved taking pictures.  I then got a job at CPI studios…otherwise known as sears.  I began loving it, especially that toddler age. I started my own business about 3 years ago, while working a full time job in the medical field.  I now only photograph…and stay home with my children of course!
8)      What or who inspires you? Do you have a photographer you look up to?
 I look up to quite a few photographers.  I love Stephanie Cotta and her style for newborn, children, and family.  Like many others, my children inspire me.  I currently have a daughter, birthday is coming up and she will be 6, who loves to help me come up with ideas.  She often comes with to sessions as she wants to be a photographer and artist.  I have 2 boys as well, ages 1 and 3, who inspire me to love that toddler age even more…no matter how “curious” they may be.
9)      When you’re doing a photoshoot or working an event, what is your favorite part?
I love getting smiles from my little clients.  I sometimes have to work hard, but I have never had a session without at least 1 smile or smirk….newborns included.
10)   What have you struggled with the most while having a career as a professional photographer? Any tips for somebody who is just starting out?
My current struggle is working in an extremely tiny space.  My indoor lighting is a challenge because of this.  I really have enough room for a beanbag and 1 light, I use a reflector, but it stays against a wall providing a little extra light.
When I started, I did not know what I wanted to specialize in.  I did a little of everything and did not value my time.  After my third, and final, child I realized my time and skill was important and I needed to charge appropriately for that.
My biggest thing for people coming into this industry is to start off valuing yourself and your time.  Do not undercharge or give super cheap sessions because as you grow as a business, people will still want those prices and you will be considered a cheap photographer.  Something some clients do not understand is they are not just paying for that hour or 2 of your time, but they are paying for: your set up, clean up, use of your props, use of your camera equipment, use of your time for the session and editing, and use of your continuous learning/expertise.
11)   Do you have any unconventional tips or tricks for getting your little clients to cooperate during a shoot?
To get my little clients to give me a more natural smile, I go back to my voice training days and have them say words that give a natural/relaxing smile.  examples:  “ice” “me” “peace”.  try them, I guarantee there will be no forced smile with any of these words.
When I photograph outdoors, I will often go shoeless.  Why?  because I choose areas where I hike up my pants and will hop in the stream with kids.  splashing is always fun!
12)   Where would you like to see your company in the next five years?
I would love to do more teaching to other photographers.  I currently teach a class on photographing your toddlers.  I would love to take this to other towns/states and continue doing these workshops.
                                                                                                                                                                                www.pinktoenailsphotography.com
Thanks Traci!
                                                                                                                                                                                                                BK2A9886
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Free Shipping from Custom Photo Props

Custom Photo Props offers FREE SHIPPING, domestic and international, on orders over $250!!

Q. What are the requirements for FREE shipping?
 
A. Order must equal $250.00 or more before any tax or shipping costs are calculated. All Furniture, Beds and 3-D mats are excluded from this offer. We have the right to ship orders by whatever method is of less cost to CPP which can cause a longer than average expectant date. Expedited shipping is excluded from this offer. Does not include insurance coverage for lost packages. You must pay separately for insurance coverage. Excludes clearance items. Can not be used with any other discount. Maximum International free shipping value of $100.00. Customer would be liable for excess shipping costs above the $100.00
 
Though shipping is free, you may be obligated to pay duty on international orders upon package arrival. Please check into this with your customs office before ordering.                                                                                                                                                                                           

“Though shipping is free, you may be obligated to pay duty on international orders upon package arrival. Please check into this with your customs office before ordering.”  —- What does that mean?? How do I know how much I’ll have to pay? Will my package be delievered to me or am I going to have to pick it up? WHY? HOW? WHHATTTT???                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

We completely understand the complications and frustrations that come with International shipping and we’re here to help. Obviously free shipping on orders over $250 is a great deal because then you won’t get stuck with shipping costs AND duty costs. Below, we have compiled a list of resources for the top 5 countries we ship to outside of the USA.

Canada

https://www.canadapost.ca/business/tools/pg/manual/pgcustoms-e.asp

http://www.dutycalculator.com/country-guides/Import-duty-taxes-when-importing-into-Canada/

Overview

  • Duty and GST/PST/HST are not charged if the FOB value, i.e. the value of the goods excluding shipping and insurance cost, does not exceed CA$20.00.
  • A handling fee of $9.95CDN per dutiable or taxable mail item is applied.
  • If duties and/or taxes are owed, items will be delivered along with the E14 Customs Invoice indicating the amount that the addressee must pay before the package can be released to them.
  • Canada Post collects the fees on behalf of the CBSA and accepts the following methods of payment:
    • Cash
    • Certified cheque or uncertified business cheque (payable to Canada Post Corporation)
    • Credit card (Visa, Master card or American Express)
    • Commercial account.
  • Upon payment and receipt of the item, importers should retain a copy of the E14 Invoice as a receipt for their records.
  • Duty rates in Canada range between 0% and 35%, where the average duty rate is 8.56%.  Some goods are not subject to duty (e.g. certain electronic products, antiques, toys, etc.).
  • Gifts from friends and relatives, valued at $60CDN or less, are duty and tax exempt.
  • Unclaimed items or items with unpaid customs or import duties will be returned to sender after 30 days and may carry a return charge. Mail marked “ABANDON” by the sender, if undeliverable, will not be returned but will be disposed of by Canada Post.

Brazil

http://www.dutycalculator.com/country-guides/Import-duty-taxes-when-importing-into-Brazil/

http://www.receita.fazenda.gov.br/Aduana/ProcAduExpImp/default.htm

http://thebrazilbusiness.com/article/how-to-import-anything-into-brazil

Overview

  • Duty rates in Brazil vary from 0% to 35%, with an average duty rate of 22.77%.
  • ICMS is a state sales tax, and therefore tax rates in Brazil vary by state
  • There is no minimum threshold in Brazil for imports of mail orders (i.e. online or telephone purchases).  Imports with a value up to US$50 sent by post, where the sender and the consignee are private individuals, are exempt from duty and taxes.

Australia

http://www.customs.gov.au/faq/DutyGST.asp

http://www.wwcf.com.au/Customs

Overview

  • Duty is calculated on the Customs Value of the goods. The rate of duty to be imposed is based on the classification of the item in the Customs Tariff.
  • GST (goods and services tax), currently 10%, is calculated on the Customs Value of the goods, plus duty, plus transport and insurance combined
  • You can apply for a tariff advice by completing a B102 (Application for Tariff Advice), for each “invoice”item. You should submit illustrative descriptive material (IDM) with your Tariff Advice Application. IDM may include, but is not limited to, photographs, website addresses, a sample of your product, product specifications, etc. This IDM will assist Customs in classifying your goods.
  • All goods imported into Australia by sea, air or post with a customs value that exceeds $1000.00 must be cleared by submitting a completed import declaration form (B650) and paying duty, goods and services tax (GST) and other taxes and charges that apply.

Germany

http://www.howtogermany.com/faq/faq-importing-goods.php

http://www.zoll.de/EN/Businesses/Movement-of-goods/Import/Duties-and-taxes/duties-and-taxes_node.html

Overview

  • Almost all goods – excluding the obviously illegal – can be imported into Germany. Non-EU citizens arriving by sea or air may bring in a total of €430 worth of goods, excluding specific restrictions on alcohol and tobacco.
  • The rate of duty to be levied on certain goods is based on the Common Customs Tariff, from which the online-accessible electronic customs tariff tables have been derived.
  • If you want to move goods under excise duty suspension you will need an aauthorization as a registered consignor
  •  The consignee must promptly store the excise goods in his tax warehouse/operation. Similarly, the beneficiary must accept the excise goods without delay. From now on the recipient is responsible for the excise goods. Basically, the goods must be physically received.

Netherlands

http://www.government.nl/issues/export-import-and-costums/taxes-on-imported-goods

http://www.belastingdienst.nl/wps/wcm/connect/bldcontenten/belastingdienst/customs/entry/process_steps_in_customs_manifest_customs_entry/process_steps_in_customs_manifest_customs_entry

Overview

  • When importing goods into the Netherlands from outside the European Union (EU), you will usually have to pay import duties. You will also have to pay VAT and in some cases excise duty, consumption tax or other levies.
  • You must file an entry summary declaration (ens) for goods that enter the first seaport or airport of the EU customs territory. The declaration applies to all goods on board a means of transport and must be filed before the means of transport enters the EU.
  • When arriving by air, both the plane and the goods must have been declared already.

Other Helpful Links:

https://www.sflworldwide.com/guide-to-custom-duties.asp

http://www.worldwidecustoms.com/CustomsServices.asp

Each country is different so make sure you know what to expect in yours! Most countries will have information on a government website or you could contact them directly to ask questions. That being said, Google is obviously a fantastic aid in your future importing endeavors. Being knowledgable about international shipping could save you some $$ in the long run.

Exposure: Interview Series

exposure
Hi all!
I’m excited to introduce you all to Talia Kite today! She’s got a lot of great things to say and the story about how she became a photographer is beautiful – seems like it really was meant to be. <3 Scroll on down to read more about Blissful Impressions.
1)      Who are you and where are you located?
My name is Talia Kite, my business is Blissful Impressions and I am located in Denver, Colorado!
 
2)      Do you have a home studio, rented space, or are you on location?
I have a natural light newborn studio that is about 200 sq feet.  This studio is mainly for newborns and I will also go to homes for lifestyle newborn sessions. Most other family sessions, engagements and weddings are held in parks, the foothills or mountains.
 
3)      What subjects are your primary focus and which do you enjoy shooting the most?
I love focusing on newborn sessions, it’s a very different shoot then most others.  There is such a trust factor you are building with the parents and creating a relationship as you are holding their most precious gift and creating beautiful, everlasting images for them.  Typically with my newborns I capture them throughout the year at their 6 month and 1 year and get to capture those milestones in their first year!
 
4)      There are so many different kinds of camera’s out there! What do you use and how did you decide on that particular one?
My current camera is a Nikon D800, I use this with a variety of lenses to capture wide angle and macro detail shots.  I chose Nikon because when you accidentally get into a film photography course in high school, you use what is given to you!  I didn’t know too much about the various types when I started out, although as I begin to gather more lenses and really get to know the cameras I was using, I decided to commit.  As I traveled through college I stayed with 35mm and medium format for a large portion of my courses and then switched to digital before graduation.  I feel there is such an importance on understanding film photography, the development process and presentation that goes into every digital image as well. When picking a digital camera it is vital to understand how it is different than the other well known brands.  While I chose to stick with Nikon it wasn’t out of just having the lenses and familiarity, it was a choice and one that I will continue to move forward with as I see fit for my business. 

5)      While we’re talking about equipment, what lens do you prefer to use and why?
My all time favorite lens is a Macro 60mm f/2.8.  It creates the most beautiful bokeh {blur behind the subject} and has a crisp, warm addition to the photos that I have not found in other lenses. While it’s perfect for those obvious close up details of newborns or wedding rings, it truly makes the photo with portraits as well. 
6)      We hear a lot of debate on natural light vs. studio light, what are your thoughts on the subject?
I think these two are so different and it is truly an art to master either one.  I am completely natural light, unless I am shooting a wedding reception, for obvious reasons, I add a flash.  I have a lot of respect for those that make studio lighting look like natural light, but for me I just use the sun.  My studio is on the 4th floor and faces South and in Colorado we get sun most days so I don’t have to worry too much about dark days {of course it is sleeting and dark as I sit and write this}. When it comes to outdoor sessions I book them 2 hours before sunset, and use that gorgeous orange glow from the sun to add another factor into my images, that I don’t think you can get from artificial lighting.  I love natural light and I always strive to be better at this craft, as no two shoots are the same!
 
7)      How did you learn to be a photographer?
I learned photography by accidentally getting into a photo 1 course.  I originally signed up for Interior Design {a big fan of TLC, Trading Spaces at the time}, and photo 1 was my back up.  Luckily my older sisters had taken the course so we had some equipment.  My dad has always been big into photography and my Grandpa was a WWII photographer who went on to start his own photography business.  It was one of those things that was meant to be, but was not obvious.
I always had trouble learning in school, classes did not come easily to me and I wasn’t a natural at anything it seemed, so I didn’t think too much about this course either.  I knew I always loved art, but this was a whole new realm.  I went out and took my first roll of film for the class, I was getting ready to go develop it and the film got stuck, we fiddled to open the camera and everything got exposed and ruined!  Naturally you are a tad bummed, but I went out again and went for round 2.  I came back to the dark room, developed some photos, entered a contest and won on my first image.  I had no idea I was good at this, of course you don’t need outside influence to tell you, but it doesn’t hurt. From then on I barely left the dark room.  I took so many photo courses I ended up in studio classes that I was the only student and made up my own assignments, assignments that teachers loved that they took to use in their own classes.  I realized I had found my calling.  When I applied for college I decided photojournalism was the way to go, as I had no idea what else you do with a love for photography.  I wanted a state school and decided to move forward with my photojournalism major, mind you, I had absolutely no idea what this would entail.  Once I realized there was no art, in my mind, as to what I was doing I took a harder focus on photography itself.  I put all of my efforts into my art courses, decided to double major in art education and photography and go on to start a photography business, 2 years out of college.  I haven’t looked back, and when I think back on how things could have turned out, I realize this is exactly what was meant to be.  All the struggles in school, the confusion, the only clear thing to me was when I held my camera and was creating, I felt calm, and nervous and comfortable and at ease and excited, and those feelings travel with me today before every session.
 
8)      What or who inspires you? Do you have a photographer you look up to?
There are so many people that are inspirational.  In our internet day and age it is far too easy to get overwhelmed with the amount of work put out there.  There is a quote I read “Comparison, is the death of happiness” and it very much holds true to a profession like photography.  Sometimes we have too much access and it is easy to get down on ourselves.  With that being said, I try to look up to photographers that I know personally, are friends with, have worked with or taken workshops from.  This is mainly because I know I can confide in them if I am looking for inspiration or encouragement.  We all go through rough patches and to have someone that you look up to and respect tell you that, times like these happen and if you don’t keep moving forward, we will just get stuck.  I am grateful to have a community of photographers I have surrounded myself with to be inspired and educated by continuously.
 
9)      When you’re doing a photoshoot or working an event, what is your favorite part?
My favorite part of a photo session is when I get into my groove.  I love to prepare as much as I can, think of poses for engagement sessions, different wrap and headband options for newborns, little jokes I can use on kids for family sessions.  The best part of it all is when everyone is feeling very comfortable and reminded that this is supposed to be fun, not stressful.  I love the feeling of everything being completed as well, knowing I got all the images anyone could possibly want and that it has come full circle.  Editing can be stressful when there is a lot to do, but it is definitely a favorite part of mine! I love completion, Knowing I started and finished something, that I created with my clients is a beautiful feeling.

10)   What have you struggled with the most while having a career as a professional photographer? Any tips for somebody who is just starting out?
The hardest part of being a photographer, professionally is creating a business.  We all have specialties that we want to share, and the idea of getting your camera, taking the photos, editing, delivering and repeating is very nice, but not the truth of the business.  How do you get those clients, how do you keep those clients, how do you get those clients to refer you to their friends and family?  There is so much that goes into running any business, and one that is so personal you have to make sure you are connecting with your clients on a deep level.  I am a very shy person to begin with, so getting out of my comfort zone was definitely a struggle!  My tip for someone starting out is, if you are uncomfortable you are doing something right.  Make sure to try out those things that you don’t know if they will work or not, they may not, but you don’t have to question it. Another huge struggle was being from Chicago, starting my business in St. Louis and moving to Denver to start over after 2 years of building a client base.  Find 50-100 people that are your ideal client, focus in on them and find out what makes them want to refer you, don’t go out looking for just anyone, find the ones that want to find you.  You are not everyone’s photography and not everyone is your client.
 
11)   Do you have any unconventional tips or tricks for getting your little clients to cooperate during a shoot?
When it comes to newborns, I send my clients a preparation pamphlet.  They know to keep baby up all morning, bring them in for a long feeding and with a warm room, white noise and a full belly, things typically move smoothly.  Pacifiers, while aren’t always parents favorites, work really well for newborn sessions.  If there are older siblings I highly suggest bringing them at the beginning or end of the session, it’s far too difficult to sit for 3 hours in warm room, while all the attention is on the new little one.
During family sessions I like to distract the kids as much as possible, playing high five and hide and go seek, make them feel like there is no camera involved, just play.  I also am more than happy to let them take some photos with my camera, one smile equals one photo they get to take.  And if all else fails, asking parents to tickle is a good option too!
 
12)   Where would you like to see your company in the next five years?
In the next 5 years I want my company to be a lifestyle for myself and my family.  I want to have more strict hours with myself, when I shoot, when I edit, when I spend time away from the business.  I hope to have a couple little ones of our own that we get to have family photos taken with and that I get to have a lifestyle with them while having a business I can uphold and continually be proud of.  I would like all of my business to be referral based and always let my clients know that they are number one, and I am forever grateful for their support and encouragement.

Thanks Talia!
Newborn, Family + Wedding photography

www.blissfulimpressions.com

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Carrie Underwood used our Honey Kisses!!

Ever wonder where celebrities get stuff for their babies?? We often ship our products to celebrities but we must admit we’re most excited that Carrie Underwood used our Honey Kisses Faux Fur!! Such a cutie <3 <3

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See the image she posted here on her facebook

facebook.com/carrieunderwood/photos

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